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The path of NASA to the moon leads through Congress. Good thing No.2 of NASA identifies his way around Capitol Hill. 

Jim Morhard might be new to space, but not to the astronauts. The deputy administrator of NASA occasionally tells the story of the way a six-year-old in Arlington, Virginia, he, alongside his elder brother, knocked on the door of a renowned neighbor. The neighbor let them pet his cat, gave them something to drink, and his brother got his autograph. That was the initial time they met John Glenn. 

It has been a little more than year since Morhard who is longtime Senate appropriations personnel, sworn in as the 14th deputy administrator of the agency. In the previous months, he has taken on a larger public profile, with many speeches and presentations. He also took on his official Twitter account, highlighting the Artemis program of NASA to return people to the surface of the moon as a precursor for more ambitious explorations determinations. 

He stated in a December 3 speech at the United States of America Commerce Chamber, a conference in Washington, that the main aim of Artemis is a red planet concept of operations. He added that they required landing people safely on the moon’s surface, landing hardware there, and starting a presence and keeping going. It might be on the surface of the moon that would be the launching point for many than the red planet. 

Straightaway after the speech, Morhard took a sit with SpaceNews Senior Staff Writer Jeff Foust to converse about the survey, prospects of NASA for getting finance to enable the plans of exploration and his initial year on the work at NASA. 

Norman Schwarzkopf stated that what they are doing is purely an excellent preparation to go to the red planet and beyond. The lunar surface is critical for everywhere they go and beyond. He was on the defense appropriations committee several years ago, after the initial Iraq War. He added that he was not worried about the fighter of the war, what worried him was the logistics tail. If he ever got power, food, electricity, trucks, everything he required to the warfighter. It is the logistics tail challenging, and they are going to have to target on that as they do on the technology. 

He added that they are happy about Doug Loverro coming on board on the previous day.  Doug arrived wearing a pin. 

By Mark Wood

Mark served in the Marine Corps as a Lance corporal before retiring to spend time with his wife and young son. Today, he works part-time in construction and has numerous hobbies that keep him active. He founded Cole of Duty to write about military news around the world. He loves to discuss politics and the US budget, often debating with his wife and coworkers about who ought to be elected in 2020.

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